1. Family: Arecaceae Bercht. & J.Presl
    1. Genus: Calyptronoma Griseb.
      1. Calyptronoma occidentalis (Sw.) H.E.Moore

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Cuba, Jamaica.

    [PW]
    General Description
    Stem to l5 m tall, 8.8-30 cm in diam. Leaf 2.8- 4.3 m long, with ca. 60 segments; segments 52-95 cm long, 2.1-4.5 cm wide, bearing inconspicuous multicellular trichomes on the abaxial intercostal surface. Prophyll 35.5-63 cm long, 5-8(-13) cm wide. Peduncle 39-98.5 cm long and 1-2.8 cm wide; rachillae (21-)26-35.5 cm long, 4.3-6.8 mm in diam, with (6-)7(-8) rows of pits; proximal rachillae borne in clusters of up to 3-4(-6) on stalks 0.7-4,I cm long, 0.5-0.9 cm wide, clustered rachillae borne for ca. 1/2 the length of the rachis; pits 1.7-4.1 mm long, 1.8-3.6 mm wide, longitudinal distance between pits (lip to lip) 4.2-9.8 mm. Staminate flowers 5-5.9 mm long; sepals 3.3-4.4 mm long, 0.9-1.1 mm wide; petals 3.5-5.7 mm long, 1.1-2.2 mm wide; staminal tube 3-5 .2 m, anthers 1.1-1.6 mm long. Pistallate flowers 4.9-6.5 mm long; sepals 3.4-4 mm long, 1-1.3 mm wide; corolla not seen; staminode not seen; glmoecium ca.6.7 mm long, style ca. 5.1 mm long; ovary 1-1.2 mm long. Fruit 9.8-15.8 mm long, 5.9-8.5 mm in diam.; endocarp free from seed, strongly net-like; seed (5.1 -)5.8-8.6 mm long, (3.9-)4.4-5.8 mm diam.
    Vernacular
    Long thatch.
    Biology
    This species is characterized by having the longest rachillae in the genus. When dry, the pit bracts are divaricating. The pollen is also distinctive. This species is tolerant of a broad range of environmental conditions. In its native Jamaica, it grows in swamps near sea level, in upland marshes (Mason River Field Station), and along mountain streams at more than 700 m above sea level. It is also the species most amenable to cultivation in southern Florida. Phenology: This species flowers in June through December; fruits have been collected throughout the year, with a peak in early spring.
    Distribution
    Endemic to wet habitats in Jamaica.
    [PW]
    Use
    Leaves are used for thatch, and stems are used for construction.

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Cuba, Jamaica

    Calyptronoma occidentalis (Sw.) H.E.Moore appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Gentes Herbarum 9: 252 (1963)

    Accepted by

    • Govaerts, R. & Dransfield, J. (2005). World Checklist of Palms: 1-223. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Govaerts, R. (1999). World Checklist of Seed Plants 3(1, 2a & 2b): 1-1532. MIM, Deurne.

    Literature

    Palmweb - Palms of the World Online
    • S. Zona, A Revision of Calyptronoma (Arecaceae). 1995
    Kew Backbone Distributions
    • Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2012). Catalogue of seed plants of the West Indies Smithsonian Contributions to Botany 98: 1-1192.

    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2018. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2018. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Palmweb - Palms of the World Online
    Palmweb 2011. Palmweb: Palms of the World Online. Published on the internet http://www.palmweb.org. Accessed on 21/04/2013
    Content licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0