1. Family: Araceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Monstera Adans.
      1. Monstera epipremnoides Engl.

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Costa Rica.

    [CATE]

    CATE Araceae, 17 Dec 2011. araceae.e-monocot.org

    General Description
    Epiphytic climber in cloud forest. Juvenile: unknown. Adult stem: 2 – 3 cm thick. Petiole: 35 – 50 cm long, vaginate to within 5 cm of the lamina base, the sheath wings persistent. Lamina: ovate, subcoriaceous, 35 – 55 cm long, 22 – 35 cm wide, pinnatifid and perforate, the pinnae 12 – 20 in number on each side, 1.0 – 2.5 cm wide, the sinuses extending to the midrib, primary lateral veins 1 or 2 per pinna, secondary lateral veins parallel to the primary; the perforations mostly small, 0.5 – 2.0 cm across, round to elliptic, located along the midrib, other perforations very elongate and extending from the midrib nearly to the margin. Peduncle: about 1 cm thick, 20 – 30 cm long. Spathe: 15 – 22 cm long. Flowering spadix: cylindric, 9 – 12 cm long, about 2 cm thick, the pistils truncate. Fruit: unknown.
    Diagnostic
    Monstera epipremnoides is very close to M. dilacerata [now called M. dissecta], from which it differs morphologically principally in the appearance of the leaves, which have narrower pinnae, as well as perforations which are not found in the leaves of M. dilacerata [now called M. dissecta]. It is further separated by its habitat. Monstera epipremnoides occurs in cloud forests at 1300 – 1800 m, while M. dilacerata [now called M. dissecta] mostly occurs below 1000 meters.
    Habitat
    Jonker-Verhoef and Jonker (1966) included Monstera epipremnoides in the flora of Surinam, based on the collection Wessels-Boer 872, housed at Utrecht. However, I consider this specimen to be M. adansonii var. laniata. Monstera epipremnoides should be excluded from consideration as a taxon in the flora of Surinam.

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Costa Rica

    Monstera epipremnoides Engl. appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 37: 118 (1905)

    Accepted by

    • Hammel, B.E. & al. (2003). Manual de Plantas de Costa Rica 2: 1-694. Missouri Botanical Garden Press, St. Louis.
    • Govaerts, R. & Frodin, D.G. (2002). World Checklist and Bibliography of Araceae (and Acoraceae): 1-560. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

    Literature

    CATE Araceae
    • Madison, M.T. 1977. A revision of Monstera (Araceae). Contrib. Gray Herb.. 207: 1-101.

    Sources

    CATE Araceae
    Haigh, A., Clark, B., Reynolds, L., Mayo, S.J., Croat, T.B., Lay, L., Boyce, P.C., Mora, M., Bogner, J., Sellaro, M., Wong, S.Y., Kostelac, C., Grayum, M.H., Keating, R.C., Ruckert, G., Naylor, M.F. and Hay, A., CATE Araceae, 17 Dec 2011.
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2018. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2018. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0