1. Family: Fabaceae Lindl.
    1. Indigastrum Jaub. & Spach

      1. This genus is accepted, and its native range is Africa, Arabian Peninsula Indian Subcontinent, N. Australia.

    [LOWO]

    Legumes of the World. Edited by G. Lewis, B. Schrire, B. MacKinder & M. Lock. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. (2005)

    Note

    Polhill (1981f) recognised 4 genera and c. 710 species in Indigofereae. This treatment following Polhill (1994), Schrire (1995), Barker et al. (2000) and Schrire et al. (2003) recognises 7 genera and c. 768 species in the tribe (Fig. 44). The Indigofereae are predominantly African-Madagascan in distribution, occurring in seasonally dry vegetation types of the tropics and subtropics. The genus Indigofera (third largest in the Leguminosae) is pantropical in distribution.

    Recent morphological-molecular analyses (Pennington et al., 2000a; Crisp et al., 2000; Wojciechowski et al., 2000, 2004; Hu, 2000; Kajita et al., 2001; Hu et al., 2002 and Wojciechowski, 2003) place Indigofereae at the base of a combined millettioid group of tribes (including Millettieae, Abreae, Phaseoleae, Desmodieae and Psoraleeae). This entire clade is sister to Hologalegina (comprising the robinioids and the Inverted Repeat Lacking Clade (IRLC)). Basally branching to these two clades are the South African Hypocalypteae and Australian tribes Mirbelieae and Bossiaeeae.

    The Indigofereae (Barker et al., 2000; Schrire et al., 2003) comprises a Cyamopsis, Indigastrum, Microcharis and Rhynchotropis (CRIM) clade which is sister to the Indigofera-Vaughania clade. The Madagascan Phylloxylon is putatively the most basally branching genus in the tribe, although in some analyses in Schrire et al. (2003), Phylloxylon is sister to the CRIM clade.

    Habit
    Herbs
    Ecology
    Seasonally dry tropical woodland, bushland, thicket or grassland, often in seasonally damp or open sandy and rocky areas
    Distribution
    Africa (except largely W Africa, mostly in Zambezian to Sudanian regions and 3 spp. in the Karoo-Namib region of southern Africa); 1 sp. pantropical
    [LOWO]
    Use
    Used as fodder and for dyes

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Angola, Botswana, Burkina, Cameroon, Cape Provinces, Cape Verde, Chad, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Free State, Gabon, Gambia, India, Kenya, KwaZulu-Natal, Lesotho, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Northern Provinces, Northern Territory, Queensland, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Western Australia, Yemen, Zambia, Zambia, Zaïre, Zimbabwe

    Introduced into:

    South Australia

    Indigastrum Jaub. & Spach appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Ill. Pl. Orient. 5: 101 (1856)

    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2018. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2018. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Legumes of the World Online
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0