1. Family: Loranthaceae Juss.
    1. Englerina Tiegh.

      1. This genus is accepted, and its native range is Tropical Africa.

    [FTEA]

    Loranthaceae, Polhill & D. Wiens. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1999

    Habit
    Shrubs 0.5–2 m., with a single haustorial attachment, glabrous or shortly hairy; hairs simple or slightly branched, spreading, with an understorey of minute irregular trichomes, often giving a scurfy appearance
    Leaves
    Leaves opposite or subopposite, the lowermost on flowering branchlets sometimes intergrading with bud-scales, sessile to generally petiolate; lamina sometimes coriaceous, but characteristically thin, sometimes flushed coppery brown, penninerved, but generally 1–several lower nerves more ascending
    Flowers
    Flowers in pedunculate umbels, 2–20, often standing up like candles from horizontal branches; bract unilaterally developed from a generally shallow cupular base, not or scarcely exceeding the calyx, often slightly gibbous
    Calyx
    Calyx annular or cup-shaped, sometimes lacerate or irregularly 4-lobed
    Corolla
    Corolla 4-lobed, joined for one-fifth to two-thirds, red, yellow, orange or pink and white, often darker on bud-swellings.
    Buds
    Buds generally 4-angular, with vents marked by bosses, often with a slight to distinctly flask-shaped basal swelling, generally at least slightly swollen over the anthers, apiculate, obtuse, truncate or 4-bossed at the tip; lobes erect, reflexed or revolute, linear to distinctly spathulate above, sometimes hardened and shiny on the inner face of the dilated part, sometimes widened at the base around vents; tube split unilaterally, the V-slit extending halfway to almost the base, often papillate inside, at least along the sutures
    Stamens
    Stamens attached at or near the base of corolla-lobes, the adnate part sometimes swollen or continued as a marked ridge down the corolla-tube, the free part tapered upwards, involute or inflexed at anthesis, produced into a tooth in front of the anther; anthers 4-thecous, with the connective slightly produced, minutely bifid
    Pistil
    Style filiform, 4-angular; stigma obovoid to globular
    Fruits
    Berry urceolate to obovoid, with persistent calyx, generally red; seed, where known, orange or yellow.
    [FZ]

    Flora Zambesiaca. Vol. 9, Part 3. Polygonaceae-Myriaceae. Pope GV, Polhill RM, Martins ES. 2006.

    Leaves
    Leaves opposite or subopposite, lowermost on flowering branchlets sometimes intergrading with bud-scales, sessile to generally petiolate; lamina sometimes coriaceous, but characteristically thin, sometimes flushed coppery-brown, penninerved, but generally 1–several lower nerves more ascending Leaves opposite or subopposite, lowermost on flowering branchlets sometimes intergrading with bud-scales, sessile to generally petiolate; lamina sometimes coriaceous, but characteristically thin, sometimes flushed coppery-brown, penninerved, but generally 1–several lower nerves more ascending.
    Flowers
    Flowers in pedunculate umbels, 2–20, often standing up like candles from horizontal branches; bract unilaterally developed from a generally shallow cupular base, not or scarcely exceeding calyx, often slightly gibbous Flowers in pedunculate umbels, 2–20, often standing up like candles from horizontal branches; bract unilaterally developed from a generally shallow cupular base, not or scarcely exceeding calyx, often slightly gibbous.
    Style
    Style filiform, 4-angular; stigma obovoid to globular
    Note
    Technically Englerina differs from Agelanthus only by the 4-merous flowers, but the pattern of divergence is different and the commonly encountered species in eastern Africa are generally characterized also by the short corolla tube and often thin leaves. The short corolla tube in the relatively advanced species provides a similarity to Oncocalyx and is probably at least in part a convergence related to the influence of short-billed pollinators. The corolla develops vents like Oncocalyx and Agelanthus (see Feehan, 1985), but the opening may be facilitated in some cases, as observed in E. inaequilatera, by squeezing the bud open.
    Distribution
    25 species in tropical Africa.
    Stamens
    Stamens attached at or near base of corolla lobes, the adnate part sometimes swollen or continued as a marked ridge down the corolla tube, free part tapered upwards, involute at anthesis, produced into a tooth in front of the anther; anthers 4-thecous, with connective slightly produced, minutely bifid. Stamens attached at or near base of corolla lobes, the adnate part sometimes swollen or continued as a marked ridge down the corolla tube, free part tapered upwards, involute at anthesis, produced into a tooth in front of the anther; anthers 4-thecous, with connective slightly produced, minutely bifid
    Pistil
    Style filiform, 4-angular; stigma obovoid to globular.
    Fruits
    Berry generally red, urceolate to obovoid, with persistent calyx; seed, where known, orange or yellow. Berry generally red, urceolate to obovoid, with persistent calyx; seed, where known, orange or yellow.
    Habit
    Shrubs 0.5–2 m in extent, with a single haustorial attachment, glabrous or shortly hairy; hairs simple or slightly branched, spreading, with an understorey of minute irregular trichomes, often giving a scurfy appearance. Shrubs 0.5–2 m in extent, with a single haustorial attachment, glabrous or shortly hairy; hairs simple or slightly branched, spreading, with an understorey of minute irregular trichomes, often giving a scurfy appearance
    Calyx
    Calyx annular or cup-shaped, sometimes lacerate or irregularly 4-lobed. Calyx annular or cup-shaped, sometimes lacerate or irregularly 4-lobed
    Corolla
    Corolla 4-lobed, joined one-fifth to two-thirds, red, yellow, orange or pink and white, often darker on bud-swellings; buds generally 4-angular, with vents marked by bosses, often with a slight basal swelling, generally at least slightly swollen over the anthers, apiculate, obtuse, truncate or 4-bossed at tip; lobes erect, reflexed or revolute, linear to distinctly spathulate above, sometimes hardened and shiny on the inner face of the dilated part, sometimes widened at base around vents; tube split unilaterally, the V-slit extending halfway to almost the base, often papillate inside, at least along the sutures. Corolla 4-lobed, joined one-fifth to two-thirds, red, yellow, orange or pink and white, often darker on bud-swellings; buds generally 4-angular, with vents marked by bosses, often with a slight basal swelling, generally at least slightly swollen over the anthers, apiculate, obtuse, truncate or 4-bossed at tip; lobes erect, reflexed or revolute, linear to distinctly spathulate above, sometimes hardened and shiny on the inner face of the dilated part, sometimes widened at base around vents; tube split unilaterally, the V-slit extending halfway to almost the base, often papillate inside, at least along the sutures

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Angola, Burkina, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Repu, Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zaïre, Zimbabwe

    Englerina Tiegh. appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Polhill, R.M. [5266], Tanzania 52391.000
    Polhill, R.M. [5266], Tanzania 52392.000
    Congdon, C.E. [107], Tanzania 52377.000
    Polhill, R.M.&D [5257], Tanzania 52383.000

    First published in Bull. Soc. Bot. France 42: 257 (1895)

    Accepted by

    • Govaerts, R. (2001). World Checklist of Seed Plants Database in ACCESS E-F: 1-50919.

    Literature

    Flora of West Tropical Africa
    • emend. Balle in Webbia 11: 581 (1955).
    • in Bull. Soc. Bot. Fr. 42: 257 (1895)
    Flora Zambesiaca
    • Polhill & Wiens, Mistletoes Afr.: 119 (1998).
    • J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 90: 133 (1985).
    • Feehan in J. Linn. Soc., Bot. 90: 133 (1985).
    • Webbia 11: 581 (1955).
    • Balle in Webbia 11: 581 (1955).
    • Bull. Soc. Bot. France 42: 257 (1895).
    • in Bull. Soc. Bot. France 42: 257 (1895).
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    • Polh. & Wiens, Mistletoes Afr.: 119 (1998)
    • in Bull. Soc. Bot. Fr. 42: 257 (1895)

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0