1. Family: Loranthaceae Juss.
    1. Oncocalyx Tiegh.

      1. This genus is accepted, and is native to Africa and Asia-Temperate..

    [FTEA]

    Loranthaceae, Polhill & D. Wiens. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1999

    Habit
    Small shrubs with a single haustorial connection, glabrous or with short spreading simple hairs
    Leaves
    Leaves mostly alternate, with 1–2 pairs of strongly ascending nerves from near the base
    Flowers
    Flowers clustered or 2–6 in very shortly pedunculate umbels; bract saucer-shaped to cupular, truncate or with a small limb
    Calyx
    Calyx cupular to tubular
    Corolla
    Corolla 5-merous, generally joined less than halfway, sometimes up to 2/3 but then with long slits below filament-insertions, opening with a V-shaped split on one side, generally yellow at least in part, sometimes banded red and white or greenish, developing vents in mature buds; tube constricted above a basal swelling or narrow throughout; lobes linear, sometimes a little broadened above, sometimes dilated around vents at the base, erect, recurved or revolute
    Stamens
    Filaments attached at the base of corolla-lobes or some distance above, inrolled at anthesis, sometimes with small appendages in front of the anther or a little below; anthers 4-thecous, truncate or with a small bilobed connective-appendage
    Pistil
    Style filiform; stigma ovoid-globose to obovoid
    Fruits
    Berry red, usually obovoid, often with a subpersistent calyx, occasionally verrucose.
    [FZ]

    Flora Zambesiaca. Vol. 9, Part 3. Polygonaceae-Myriaceae. Pope GV, Polhill RM, Martins ES. 2006.

    Style
    Style filiform; stigma ovoid-globose to obovoid
    Note
    Oncocalyx (Odontella, the more familiar name, is unfortunately preoccupied by A genus of diatoms) is generally easily recognized by the shortly tubular 5-merous flowers opening by a V-shaped slit. There is considerable variation in the extent to which the flowers are adapted to provide an explosive release of pollen. In the species sometimes attributed to Tieghemia, from forests, coasts and less arid woodland, represented by O. bolusii in the Flora Zambesiaca area, the petals are only weakly joined for some distance above the point to which the V-slit extends and the long filaments are only weakly coiled. Species of drier habitats, mostly in NE and SW Africa, have more firmly united petals and shorter more tightly coiled filaments and other specializations.
    Distribution
    Oncocalyx (Odontella, the more familiar name, is unfortunately preoccupied by A genus of diatoms) is generally easily recognized by the shortly tubular 5-merous flowers opening by a V-shaped slit. There is considerable variation in the extent to which the 13 species in the drier forests and bushland of eastern and southern Africa to Arabia.
    Habit
    Small shrubs, with a single haustorial connection, glabrous or with short spreading simple hairs. Small shrubs, with a single haustorial connection, glabrous or with short spreading simple hairs
    Leaves
    Leaves mostly alternate, with 1–2 pairs of strongly ascending nerves from near the base. Leaves mostly alternate, with 1–2 pairs of strongly ascending nerves from near the base
    Flowers
    Flowers clustered or 2–6 in very shortly pedunculate umbels; bract saucer-shaped to cupular, truncate or with a small limb. Flowers clustered or 2–6 in very shortly pedunculate umbels; bract saucer-shaped to cupular, truncate or with a small limb
    Calyx
    Calyx cupular to tubular. Calyx cupular to tubular
    Corolla
    Corolla 5-merous, generally joined less than halfway, sometimes up to two-thirds but then with long slits below filament insertions, opening with a V-shaped slit on one side, generally yellow at least in part, sometimes banded red and white or greenish, developing vents in mature buds; tube constricted above a basal swelling or narrow throughout; lobes linear, sometimes a little broadened above, erect, recurved or revolute. Corolla 5-merous, generally joined less than halfway, sometimes up to two-thirds but then with long slits below filament insertions, opening with a V-shaped slit on one side, generally yellow at least in part, sometimes banded red and white or greenish, developing vents in mature buds; tube constricted above a basal swelling or narrow throughout; lobes linear, sometimes a little broadened above, erect, recurved or revolute
    Stamens
    Stamen filaments attached at base of corolla lobes or some distance above, inrolled at anthesis, sometimes with small appendages in front of the anther or a little below; anthers 4-thecous, truncate or with a small bilobed connective-appendage. Stamen filaments attached at base of corolla lobes or some distance above, inrolled at anthesis, sometimes with small appendages in front of the anther or a little below; anthers 4-thecous, truncate or with a small bilobed connective-appendage
    Pistil
    Style filiform; stigma ovoid-globose to obovoid.
    Fruits
    Berry red, usually obovoid, often with a persistent calyx, occasionally muricate. Berry red, usually obovoid, often with a persistent calyx, occasionally muricate.

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Angola, Cape Provinces, Ethiopia, Kenya, KwaZulu-Natal, Mozambique, Namibia, Northern Provinces, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe

    Oncocalyx Tiegh. appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Bull. Soc. Bot. France 42: 258 (1895)

    Literature

    Flora Zambesiaca
    • Polhill & Wiens, Mistletoes Afr.: 101 (1998).
    • Bull. Soc. Bot. France 42: 258 (1895).
    • in Bull. Soc. Bot. France 42: 258 (1895).
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    • Polh. & Wiens, Mistletoes Afr.: 101 (1998)
    • M.G. Gilbert, Polh. & Wiens in Nordic Journ. Bot. 5: 222 (1985)
    • in Bull. Soc. Bot. Fr. 42: 258 (1895)

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0