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There are 15 species of Allamanda from South and Central America, named by Linnaeus in honour of the Swiss doctor and botanist, Dr Frédéric-Louis Allamand, who visited Guyana in the early 18th century. Allamandas have become popular in gardens throughout the tropics, where some species have become naturalised and even invasive. In temperate countries they are grown as greenhouse plants for their freely produced, brightly coloured flowers.

[KSP]

Kew Species Profiles

General Description
The golden trumpet vine has clusters of particularly striking golden-yellow flowers, which contrast with the shiny dark green leaves to make a lush plant for the conservatory.

There are 15 species of Allamanda from South and Central America, named by Linnaeus in honour of the Swiss doctor and botanist, Dr Frédéric-Louis Allamand, who visited Guyana in the early 18th century. Allamandas have become popular in gardens throughout the tropics, where some species have become naturalised and even invasive. In temperate countries they are grown as greenhouse plants for their freely produced, brightly coloured flowers.

Species Profile
Geography and distribution

Allamanda cathartica is a native of tropical South America, from Peru and Colombia eastwards to French Guiana and Brazil. It has also been recorded in Central America as far north as Honduras. It is widely cultivated elsewhere in the tropics.

Description

This vigorous climbing plant has leathery evergreen leaves arranged in whorls of 4 at intervals along the stem and bright yellow flowers. The stems twine to 6 m or considerably more and contain milky sap.

The lance-shaped leaves are 6 cm long and 3 cm wide. Golden-yellow funnel-shaped flowers up to around 9 cm long and 6 cm in diameter are held in groups of 12 on short branches at the ends of shoots or in the leaf axils. The prickly seed pods contain winged seeds.

The form named 'Hendersonii' has larger flowers and is most commonly grown in Europe.

Curtis's Botanical Magazine

Three species of Allamanda have been illustrated in Curtis's Botanical Magazine , under a variety of names. Allamanda cathartica appeared first in a hand-coloured engraving (artist unknown) in 1796 (see image, right). It was also illustrated in 1848 by W.H. Fitch as A. schottii , and as A. aubletii . In 1868 it was illustrated again by W. Fitch, under the name A. nobilis .

According to William Curtis (founder of The Botanical Magazine ),  Allamanda cathartica  is a 'beautiful stove plant […] introduced to this country [UK] in 1785, by Baron Hake'. Christian Ludwig von Hake (1745-1818) was a German minister and keen amateur botanist, after whom the genus  Hakea was named by Heinrich Adolph Schrader, Director of the Old Botanical Garden of Göttingen University.

Curtis's Botanical Magazine (Editor: Martyn Rix) provides an international forum of particular interest to botanists and horticulturists, plant ecologists and those with a special interest in botanical illustration.

Now well over 200 years old, the magazine is the longest running botanical periodical featuring colour illustrations of plants. Each four-part volume contains 24 plant portraits reproduced from watercolour originals by leading international botanical artists. Detailed but accessible articles combine horticultural and botanical information, history, conservation and economic uses of the plants described.

Find out more about Curtis's Botanical Magazine

Threats and conservation

The species is widespread both in the wild and cultivation but has not been evaluated according to IUCN Red List criteria.

Uses

Golden trumpet vine is widely cultivated as an ornamental. In some areas of the tropics it has escaped from cultivation and become a weed, most notably in the rain forests of northern Queensland.

Extracts of leaves, roots and flowers have been shown to have in vivo anti-tumour activity against leukaemia in mice, and against human carcinoma of the nasopharynx (nasal cavity and upper part of the throat) in culture. Leaf and root decoctions are used as a laxative and emetic in traditional medicine in a number of tropical countries, but large doses are toxic.

Cultivation

Golden trumpet vine needs plenty of direct sun to flower well and should be allowed to climb up a trellis or a similar support. Propagation is by stem-tip cuttings in spring.

This species at Kew

Golden trumpet vine can be found in the Palm House and in the Waterlily House.

Pressed and dried, and alcohol-preserved specimens of Allamanda cathartica are held in Kew's Herbarium, where they are available to researchers from around the world, by appointment. The details of some of these, including images, can be seen online in the Herbarium Catalogue.

Kew's Economic Botany Collection includes samples of fruits, seeds and the wood of Allamanda cathartica .

New discoveries

A new species of Allamanda was described from north-eastern Brazil as recently as 2009 by Alessandro Rapini and Rita Fabiana de Souza-Silva. Rapini spent a year on a Kew fellowship working on the systematics and evolutionary relationships of New World Apocynaceae, in collaboration with Kew's resident experts. He was subsequently able to demonstrate that the more evolutionarily derived groups of the family that diversified in Central and South America were the result of just four introductions from Africa over the last 20 million years.

Distribution
Brazil, French Guiana, Peru
Ecology
Near coasts, climbing through trees or shrubs in mangrove swamps and along lowland streams.
Conservation
Not evaluated according to IUCN Red List criteria.
Hazards

All parts are poisonous if eaten; its sap causes skin and eye irritation.

[CPLC]

Bernal, R., Gradstein, S.R. & Celis, M. (eds.). 2015. Catálogo de plantas y líquenes de Colombia. Instituto de Ciencias Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá. http://catalogoplantasdecolombia.unal.edu.co

Distribution
Nativa y cultivada en Colombia; Alt. 0 - 1900 m.; Amazonia, Andes, Islas Caribeñas, Llanura del Caribe, Orinoquia, Pacífico, Valle del Cauca, Valle del Magdalena.
Morphology General Habit
Subarbusto, arbusto, trepadora
Conservation
No Evaluada

[FTEA]

Apocynaceae, E.A. Omino. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 2002

Diagnostic
Leaves whorled, glossy; flowers golden, to 8 cm across. Allamanda have very spiny subglobose fruits.

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[KSP]
Use
Ornamental, medicinal.

Native to:

Bolivia, Brazil North, Brazil Northeast, Brazil South, Brazil Southeast, Brazil West-Central, Colombia, Costa Rica, French Guiana, Guyana, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panamá, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela

Introduced into:

Andaman Is., Bangladesh, Belize, Caroline Is., China Southeast, Cook Is., East Himalaya, El Salvador, Gabon, Gilbert Is., Guatemala, Gulf of Guinea Is., Hainan, India, Jawa, Madagascar, Malaya, Mexico Central, Mexico Southeast, Mexico Southwest, Puerto Rico, Samoa, Society Is., Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, Trinidad-Tobago, Zimbabwe

English
Golden trumpet vine

Allamanda cathartica L. appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
Dec 12, 2005 Ambriansah et al. [3095], Indonesia K000229395
Jul 16, 2004 Reynoso [PPI 24139], Philippines K000227745
Jan 1, 1986 Hopkins, M.J.G. [552], Brazil K000965623
Jan 1, 1984 Strudwick, J.J. [3367], Brazil K000965622
Jan 1, 1970 Cavalcante, P.B. [2444], Brazil K000965628
Jan 1, 1968 Irwin, H.S. [19077], Brazil K000965625
Jan 1, 1960 Irwin, H.S. [s.n.], French Guiana K000965627
Jan 1, 1927 Dusén, P. [11448], Brazil K000965636
Forman, L. [69] 22130.000
Zarucchi, J.L. [3225], Brazil K000965624
Krukoff, B.A. [5873], Brazil K000965629
Spruce, R. [122], Brazil K000965634
Burchell [9729], Brazil K001078020
Glaziou, A.F.M. [12945], Brazil K000965637
Spruce, R. [122], Brazil K000965635
Burchell [9361], Brazil K000965632
Fróes, R.L. [1707], Brazil K000965626
Gardner [6059], Brazil K000965631
Philcox, D. [4451], Brazil K000965630
Gardner [6059], Brazil K000965633

First published in Mant. Pl. 2: 214 (1771)

Accepted by

  • Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2012). Catalogue of seed plants of the West Indies Smithsonian Contributions to Botany 98: 1-1192.
  • Cheeseman, E.E. in Williams, R.O. (1947). Apocynaceae Flora of Trinidad and Tobago 2(3): 144-162. Government Printing Office, Port-of-Spain.
  • Choudhary, R.K., Srivastava, R.C., Das, A.K. & Lee, J. (2012). Floristic diversity assessment and vegetation analysis of Upper Siang district of eastern Himalaya in North East India Korean Journal of Plant Taxonomy 42: 222-246.
  • Davidse, G. & al. (eds.) (2009). Flora Mesoamericana 4(1): 1-855. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D.F.
  • Garcia-Mendoza, A.J. & Meave, J.A. (eds.) (2012). Diversidad florística de Oaxaca: de musgos a angiospermas (colecciones y listas de especies), ed. 2: 1-351. Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
  • Govaerts, R. (1995). World Checklist of Seed Plants 1(1, 2): 1-483, 1-529. MIM, Deurne.
  • Govaerts, R. (2003). World Checklist of Selected Plant Families Database in ACCESS: 1-216203. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Hokche, O., Berry, P.E. & Huber, O. (eds.) (2008). Nuevo Catálogo de la Flora Vascular de Venezuela: 1-859. Fundación Instituto Botánico de Venezuela.
  • Idárraga-Piedrahita, A., Ortiz, R.D.C., Callejas Posada, R. & Merello, M. (eds.) (2011). Flora de Antioquia: Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares 2: 1-939. Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín.
  • Jørgensen, P.M., Nee, M.H. & Beck., S.G. (eds.) (2013). Catálogo de las plantas vasculares de Bolivia Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 127: 1-1741.
  • López Patiño, E.J., Szeszko, D.R., Rascala Pérez, J. & Beltrán Retis, A.S. (2012). The flora of the Tenacingo-Malinalco-Zumpahuacán protected natural area, state of Mexico, Mexico Harvard Papers in Botany 17: 65-167.
  • Middleton, D.J. (2011). Flora of peninsular Malaysia, II, 2: 1-235. Institut Penyelidikan Perhutanan Malaysia.
  • Middleton, J.D. (ed.) (2019). Flora of Singapore 13: 1-654. Singapore Botanic Gardens.
  • Morales, J.F. (2005). Estudios en las Apocynaceae Neotropicales XIX: La familia Apocynaceae s.str. (Apocynoideae, Rauvolfioideae) de Costa Rica Darwiniana 43: 90-191.
  • Morales, J.F. (2006). Estudios en las Apocynaceae Neotropicales XXVIII: le familia Apocynaceae (Apocynoideae, Rauvolfioideae) de El Salvador, Centroamérica Darwiniana 44: 453-489.
  • Morales, J.F. (2009). Estudios en las Apocynaceae neotropicales XXXIX: revisión de las Apocynoideae y Rauvolfioideae de Honduras Anales del Jardin Botanico de Madrid 66: 217-262.
  • Morales, J.F. (2014). Studies in the Neotropical Apocynaceae L: The genus Allamanda in Colombia and a new combination Phytotaxa 162: 51-56.
  • Mostaph, M.K. & Uddin, S.B. (2013). Dictionary of plant names of Bangladesh, Vasc. Pl.: 1-434. Janokalyan Prokashani, Chittagong, Bangladesh.
  • Nelson Sutherland, C.H. (2008). Catálogo de las plantes vasculares de Honduras. Espermatofitas: 1-1576. SERNA/Guaymuras, Tegucigalpa, Honduras.
  • Sosef, M.S.M. & al. (2006). Check-list des plantes vasculaires du Gabon Scripta Botanica Belgica 35: 1-438.
  • Stevens, W.D., Ulloa U., C., Pool, A. & Montiel, O.M. (2001). Flora de Nicaragua Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 85: i-xlii, 1-2666.
  • Velayos, M., Barberá, P., Cabezas, F.J., de la Estrella, M., Fero, M. & Aedo, C. (2014). Checklist of the vascular plants of Annobón (Equatorial Guinea) Phytotaxa 171: 1-78.
  • Walderley, M.G.L., Shepherd, G.J., Melhem, T.S. & Giulietti, A.M. (eds.) (2005). Flora Fanerogâmica do Estado de São Paulo 4: 1-392. Instituto de Botânica, São Paulo.
  • Welsh, S.L. (1998). Flora Societensis: 1-420. E.P.S. Inc. Utah.

Literature

Kew Species Profiles

  • Akah P.A. & Offiah V.N. (1992). Gastrointestinal effects of Allamanda cathartica leaf extracts. Pharmaceutical Biology 30: 213-217.
  • Herklots, G. (1976). Flowering Tropical Climbers. Dawson Science History Publications, Folkestone.
  • Phillips, R. & Rix, M. (1997). Conservatory and Indoor Plants. Vol. 2. Pan Books, London.
  • Rapini, A., Chase, M.W., Goyder, D.J. & Griffiths, J. (2003). Asclepiadeae classification: evaluating the phylogenetic relationships of New World Asclepiadoideae (Apocynaceae). Taxon 52: 33–50.
  • Rapini, A., van den Berg, C. & Liede-Schumann, S. (2007). Diversification of the Asclepiadoideae (Apocynaceae) in the New World. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 94: 407-422.
  • Sakane, M. & Shepherd, G.J. (1986). Uma revisão do gênero Allamanda L. (Apocynaceae). Revista Brasileira de Botânica 9: 125-149.
  • Slamet Sutanti Budi Rahayu (2001). Allamanda L. In: Plant Resources of South-East Asia No. 12(2). Medicinal and Poisonous Plants 2, eds J.L.C.H. Van Valkenburg & N. Bunyapraphatsara, pp. 49-52. Backhuys, Leiden, the Netherlands.
  • Souza-Silva, R. F. de & Rapini, A. (2009). Allamanda calcicola (Apocynaceae), an overlooked new species from limestone outcrops in the states of Minas Gerais and Bahia, Brazil. Kew Bulletin 64: 171-174.
  • World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (2010). Allamanda cathartica. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2012). Catalogue of seed plants of the West Indies Smithsonian Contributions to Botany 98: 1-1192.
  • Cheeseman, E.E. in Williams, R.O. (1947). Apocynaceae Flora of Trinidad and Tobago 2(3): 144-162. Government Printing Office, Port-of-Spain.
  • Choudhary, R.K., Srivastava, R.C., Das, A.K. & Lee, J. (2012). Floristic diversity assessment and vegetation analysis of Upper Siang district of eastern Himalaya in North East India Korean Journal of Plant Taxonomy 42: 222-246.
  • Christopherson, E. (1935). Flowering Plants of Samoa Bernice P. Bishop Museum Bulletin 128: 1-221.
  • Davidse, G. & al. (eds.) (2009). Flora Mesoamericana 4(1): 1-855. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, D.F.
  • Fosberg, F.R. & Sachet, M.-H. (1987). Flora of the Gilbert Island, Kiribati, Checklist Atoll Research Bulletin 295: 1-33.
  • Fosberg, F.R. (1975). Vascular plants of Aitutaki Atoll Research Bulletin 190: 73-84.
  • Garcia-Mendoza, A.J. & Meave, J.A. (eds.) (2012). Diversidad florística de Oaxaca: de musgos a angiospermas (colecciones y listas de especies), ed. 2: 1-351. Instituto de Biología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
  • Jørgensen, P.M., Nee, M.H. & Beck., S.G. (eds.) (2013). Catálogo de las plantas vasculares de Bolivia Monographs in Systematic Botany from the Missouri Botanical Garden 127: 1-1741.
  • López Patiño, E.J., Szeszko, D.R., Rascala Pérez, J. & Beltrán Retis, A.S. (2012). The flora of the Tenacingo-Malinalco-Zumpahuacán protected natural area, state of Mexico, Mexico Harvard Papers in Botany 17: 65-167.
  • Middleton, D.J. (2011). Flora of peninsular Malaysia, II, 2: 1-235. Institut Penyelidikan Perhutanan Malaysia.
  • Morales, J.F. (2006). Estudios en las Apocynaceae Neotropicales XXVIII: le familia Apocynaceae (Apocynoideae, Rauvolfioideae) de El Salvador, Centroamérica Darwiniana 44: 453-489.
  • Morales, J.F. (2009). Estudios en las Apocynaceae neotropicales XXXIX: revisión de las Apocynoideae y Rauvolfioideae de Honduras Anales del Jardin Botanico de Madrid 66: 217-262.
  • Mostaph, M.K. & Uddin, S.B. (2013). Dictionary of plant names of Bangladesh, Vasc. Pl.: 1-434. Janokalyan Prokashani, Chittagong, Bangladesh.
  • Pandey, R.P. & Dilwakar, P.G. (2008). An integrated check-list flora of Andaman and Nicobar islands, India Journal of Economic and Taxonomic Botany 32: 403-500.
  • Sosef, M.S.M. & al. (2006). Check-list des plantes vasculaires du Gabon Scripta Botanica Belgica 35: 1-438.
  • Velayos, M., Barberá, P., Cabezas, F.J., de la Estrella, M., Fero, M. & Aedo, C. (2014). Checklist of the vascular plants of Annobón (Equatorial Guinea) Phytotaxa 171: 1-78.
  • Walderley, M.G.L., Shepherd, G.J., Melhem, T.S. & Giulietti, A.M. (eds.) (2005). Flora Fanerogâmica do Estado de São Paulo 4: 1-392. Instituto de Botânica, São Paulo.
  • Welsh, S.L. (1998). Flora Societensis: 1-420. E.P.S. Inc. Utah.

Flora of Tropical East Africa

  • – R. O. Williams, Useful and Ornamental Plants in Zanzibar and Pemba p. 114, ill. (1949).

Catálogo de Plantas y Líquenes de Colombia
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Colombian resources for Plants made Accessible
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Flora of Tropical East Africa
Flora of Tropical East Africa
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Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Science Photographs
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Kew Species Profiles
Kew Species Profiles
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