1. Family: Phyllanthaceae Martinov
    1. Genus: Heywoodia Sim
      1. Heywoodia lucens Sim

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Kenya to S. Africa.

    [FTEA]

    Euphorbiaceae, A. R.-Smith. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1987

    Habit
    A large, much-branched glabrous tree up to 30 m.
    Bark
    Bark rough, greyish brown, cracking and flaking off.
    Twigs
    Twigs pale grey or greyish brown.
    Shoots
    Young shoots 4-angled at first, soon becoming terete.
    Leaves
    Leaf-blade broadly ovate to elliptic-ovate, peltate or basally attached, 4–15(–25) cm. long, 2–12(–15) cm. wide, shortly obtusely or subacutely acuminate, cuneate, rounded, truncate or, less often, shallowly cordate at base, entire, firmly coriaceous, shiny, lateral nerves 6–8(–13) pairs, 2–3 of these somewhat crowded at the base in the juvenile peltate leaves, looped well within the margin, and often with another series of loops towards the margin, tertiary nerves loosely reticulate, slightly prominent above, somewhat more so beneath, dark green above, grey-green beneath. Petioles 1–2(–4) cm. long.
    Stipules
    Stipules triangular, 0.5–1.5 mm. long, acute, very fugacious.
    Male
    Male flowers:bracts transversely ovate, 1 mm. long, 1.5 mm. wide, somewhat erose, chaffy; sepals resembling the bracts, but a little larger, and ciliolate; petals elliptic-oblong, 2–2.5 mm. long, 0.75 mm. broad, slightly erose, membranous; disc 0.75 mm. diameter; stamens 3 mm. long, anthers 1 mm. long; pistillode 1 mm. long.
    Flowers
    Female flowers:bracts as in the ♂ flowers; pedicels 3–5 mm. long, extending or not to up to 1 cm. long in fruit, with 1–2 sepaloid bracteoles ± half-way along; sepals 2–3 and petals 5–6, resembling those of the ♂ flowers; disc 1.5 mm. diameter; staminodes 1 mm. long; ovary ovoid-subglobose, 1.5 mm. long, 1.5 mm. diameter; stigmas 0.5 mm. long, slightly papillose. Male flowers:bracts transversely ovate, 1 mm. long, 1.5 mm. wide, somewhat erose, chaffy; sepals resembling the bracts, but a little larger, and ciliolate; petals elliptic-oblong, 2–2.5 mm. long, 0.75 mm. broad, slightly erose, membranous; disc 0.75 mm. diameter; stamens 3 mm. long, anthers 1 mm. long; pistillode 1 mm. long.
    Female
    Female flowers:bracts as in the ♂ flowers; pedicels 3–5 mm. long, extending or not to up to 1 cm. long in fruit, with 1–2 sepaloid bracteoles ± half-way along; sepals 2–3 and petals 5–6, resembling those of the ♂ flowers; disc 1.5 mm. diameter; staminodes 1 mm. long; ovary ovoid-subglobose, 1.5 mm. long, 1.5 mm. diameter; stigmas 0.5 mm. long, slightly papillose.
    Fruits
    Fruit 1 cm. long, 1.5 cm. diameter; endocarp 1 mm. thick, with 3–4 vascular traces on the septum; columella 5–7 mm. long.
    Seeds
    Seeds 7–8 mm. long, 5–6 mm. wide, greyish-brown to dark brown.
    Figures
    Fig. 12.
    Habitat
    Dominant or often forming pure stands in riverine forest, evergreen forest remnants, semi-swamp forest or on or near termitaria; 1150–1770 m.
    Distribution
    K4 T1 U2
    [FZ]

    Euphorbiaceae, A. Radcliffe-Smith. Flora Zambesiaca 9:4. 1996

    Habit
    A large evergreen tree up to 25 m tall.
    Bark
    Bark grey, irregularly peeling in corky sheets or patches.
    Twigs
    Twigs pale greyish-brown.
    Stipules
    Stipules c. 1 × 0.5 mm, elliptic-ovate, subacute.
    Petiole
    Petioles 1–2 cm long (crown foliage).Leaf blade 6–12 × 5–8 cm (larger on sucker growth), broadly ovate to elliptic-ovate, shortly acuminate, cuneate, rounded or truncate at the base, entire, lateral nerves in 8–12, looped well within the margin, with a second series of loops towards the margin, tertiary nerves loosely reticulate, slightly prominent above, more so beneath.
    Bracts
    Bracts 1 × 1.5 mm, transversely ovate, erose, chaffy.
    Male
    Male flowers: sepals resembling the bracts, but slightly larger, ciliolate; petals 2–2.5 × 0.75 mm, elliptic-oblong, slightly erose, membranous; disk 0.75 mm in diameter; stamens 3 mm long, anthers 1 mm long; pistillode 1 mm high.
    Flowers
    Female flowers: pedicels 3–5 mm long, extending to up to 1 cm long in fruit; bracteoles 1.5 × 1 mm, ovate, chaffy; sepals 2–3, resembling the bracteoles; petals 5–6, resembling those of the male; disk 1.5 mm in diameter; staminodes c. 1 mm long; ovary 1.5 × 1.5 mm, ovoid-subglobose, shallowly 4- or 5-lobed; stigmas 0.5 mm long, slightly papillose. Male flowers: sepals resembling the bracts, but slightly larger, ciliolate; petals 2–2.5 × 0.75 mm, elliptic-oblong, slightly erose, membranous; disk 0.75 mm in diameter; stamens 3 mm long, anthers 1 mm long; pistillode 1 mm high.
    Female
    Female flowers: pedicels 3–5 mm long, extending to up to 1 cm long in fruit; bracteoles 1.5 × 1 mm, ovate, chaffy; sepals 2–3, resembling the bracteoles; petals 5–6, resembling those of the male; disk 1.5 mm in diameter; staminodes c. 1 mm long; ovary 1.5 × 1.5 mm, ovoid-subglobose, shallowly 4- or 5-lobed; stigmas 0.5 mm long, slightly papillose.
    Fruits
    Fruit 1 × 1.5 cm, green; endocarp 1 mm thick, with 3–4 vascular traces on each septum; columella 5–7 mm long.
    Seeds
    Seeds 7–8 × 5–6 × 3–4 mm, smooth, dark brown.

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Cape Provinces, Kenya, KwaZulu-Natal, Mozambique, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda

    Heywoodia lucens Sim appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Kenya 2627.000
    Bally, P.R.O. [B 5133], Kenya 16764.000
    Bally, P.R.O. [B. 7373A], Kenya 4156.000
    van Rensburg, A.V., South Africa 15811.000
    Dale, I.R. [K. 470], Kenya 2626.000
    Luckhoff, H.A. [2], South Africa 4155.000
    Luckhoff, H.A. [1], South Africa 5235.000
    Luckhoff, H.A. [3], South Africa 5237.000

    First published in Forest Fl. Cape: 326 (1907)

    Accepted by

    • Calane da Silva, M., Izdine, S. & Amuse, A.B. (2004). A Preliminary Checklist of the Vascular Plants of Mozambique: 1-184. SABONET, Pretoria.
    • Govaerts, R., Frodin, D.G. & Radcliffe-Smith, A. (2000). World Checklist and Bibliography of Euphorbiaceae (and Pandaceae) 1-4: 1-1622. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

    Literature

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    • Dale & Greenway, Kenya Trees and Shrubs p. 204 (1961).
    • Hutch. in Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information, Kew 1922: 115 (1922), descr. emend. et ampl.
    • Pax in A. Engler, Das Pflanzenreich IV. 147(15): 280 (1922).
    • A. Engler & O. Drude, Die Vegetation Der Erde, IX, Pflanzenwelt Afrikas 3(2): 36 (1921).
    • Hutch. in Fl. Cap. 5(2): 385 (1920).
    • Sim, For. Fl. Cape Col.: 326, t. 140, fig. 1 (1907).

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0