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  1. Family: Myricaceae Rich. ex Kunth
    1. Genus: Myrica L.
      1. Myrica microbracteata Weim.

        This species is accepted, and its native range is E. Zimbabwe (Mt. Nyangani), Mpumalanga to KwaZulu-Natal.

    [FZ]

    Flora Zambesiaca. Vol. 9, Part 3. Polygonaceae-Myriaceae. Pope GV, Polhill RM, Martins ES. 2006.

    Type
    Type:Zimbabwe, Mt. Nyanga (Inyangani), T.C.E. Fries, Norlindh & Weimarck 3575 (LD, holotype; K; SRGH).
    Inflorescences
    Male catkins 8–10 mm long; bracts 1.2–1.8 mm long, broadly ovate-triangular, becoming more deltate and contracted abruptly to a narrow base, concave, minutely ciliolate; stamens 3–4 (but usually single when at base of female catkins) Female (and bisexual) catkins 10–15 mm long, the axis evident and pubescent; bracts 2 mm long, ovate-triangular, glandular dorsally; bracteoles generally 4, 0.5–0.8 mm long, ovate, concave, ciliolate; stigma arms 2 mm long, long-caudate, slightly serrate Female (and bisexual) catkins 10–15 mm long, the axis evident and pubescent; bracts 2 mm long, ovate-triangular, glandular dorsally; bracteoles generally 4, 0.5–0.8 mm long, ovate, concave, ciliolate; stigma arms 2 mm long, long-caudate, slightly serrate. Male catkins 8–10 mm long; bracts 1.2–1.8 mm long, broadly ovate-triangular, becoming more deltate and contracted abruptly to a narrow base, concave, minutely ciliolate; stamens 3–4 (but usually single when at base of female catkins).
    Ecology
    Montane grassland, among rocks, and along streams; 1200–2530 m.
    Note
    Apparently most closely related to M. serrata, within which it was included by White, loc. cit. (1993). Leaf shapes can be matched to some extent in South Africa, but M. microbracteata looks very different from the normal plants of M. serrata collected along the rivers of Nyangani and elsewhere in the Flora Zambesiaca region.
    Distribution
    Nyangani. Zimbabwe Known only from Mt. ZIM E
    Habit
    Shrub 1.2–3 m tall, ultimate floriferous branches rather short, crowded and leafy, dioecious or monoecious with male flowers at the base of the otherwise female catkins. Shrub 1.2–3 m tall, ultimate floriferous branches rather short, crowded and leafy, dioecious or monoecious with male flowers at the base of the otherwise female catkins
    Branches
    Branchlets appressed to spreading pubescent, with many glands. Branchlets appressed to spreading pubescent, with many glands
    Leaves
    Leaves subsessile; petiole 1–1.5 mm long, comprising the basal pulvinus; blades 20–45 × 3–8 mm, linear-oblanceolate, 5–8 times as long as broad, acute at the apex, long-cuneate to the base, coarsely serrate in the upper third or half, glabrous, with or without scattered golden glands above, but generally present beneath; lateral nerves immersed and inconspicuous in the vein reticulum on the lower part beneath, more evident higher up where they run into the marginal teeth. Leaves subsessile; petiole 1–1.5 mm long, comprising the basal pulvinus; blades 20–45 × 3–8 mm, linear-oblanceolate, 5–8 times as long as broad, acute at the apex, long-cuneate to the base, coarsely serrate in the upper third or half, glabrous, with or without scattered golden glands above, but generally present beneath; lateral nerves immersed and inconspicuous in the vein reticulum on the lower part beneath, more evident higher up where they run into the marginal teeth
    Male
    Male catkins 8–10 mm long; bracts 1.2–1.8 mm long, broadly ovate-triangular, becoming more deltate and contracted abruptly to a narrow base, concave, minutely ciliolate; stamens 3–4 (but usually single when at base of female catkins).
    Female and Hermaphrodite
    Female (and bisexual) catkins 10–15 mm long, the axis evident and pubescent; bracts 2 mm long, ovate-triangular, glandular dorsally; bracteoles generally 4, 0.5–0.8 mm long, ovate, concave, ciliolate; stigma arms 2 mm long, long-caudate, slightly serrate.
    Fruits
    Fruits 2.5–3 mm across, globose to slightly depressed-globose. Fruits 2.5–3 mm across, globose to slightly depressed-globose.

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    KwaZulu-Natal, Northern Provinces, Zimbabwe

    Synonyms

    Other Data

    Myrica microbracteata Weim. appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Jan 1, 1932 Fries, T.C.E. [3575], Zimbabwe K000243535

    Bibliography

    First published in Bot. Not. 1934: 87 (1934)

    Not accepted by

    • Pope, G.V., Polhill, R.M. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2006). Flora Zambesiaca 9(3): 1-277. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. [Cited as Morella microbracteata.]

    Literature

    Kew Backbone Distributions

    • Pope, G.V., Polhill, R.M. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2006). Flora Zambesiaca 9(3): 1-277. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
    • Germishuizen, G. & Meyer, N.L. (eds.) (2003). Plants of Southern Africa an annotated checklist Strelitzia 14: 1-1231. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.
    Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0