1. Family: Sapindaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Deinbollia Schumach. & Thonn.
      1. Deinbollia oreophila Cheek

        This species is accepted, and its native range is SE. Nigeria to SW. Cameroon.

    [KBu]

    Cheek, M. & Etuge, M. 2009. Deinbollia oreophila (Sapindaceae), a new submontane species from Western Cameroon and adjoining Nigeria. Kew Bulletin 64: 503. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-009-9132-4

    Ovary
    Ovary inconspicuous
    Note
    D. maxima sensu Cable (1998: 126) quoadKeay FHI 37489. D. sp. 1 Cheek in Harvey et al. (2004: 125); Cheek in Cheek et al. (2004: 399). The specific epithet of Deinbolliaoreophila is derived from the Greek, meaning ‘mountain-loving Deinbollia’ to indicate its preference for this habitat. No observations have been recorded of the pollinators or seed dispersers of this species. However, the masses of white, cup-shaped flowers which are sweetly-scented at noon suggest bee-pollination, while the 2 – 3 cm diam., orange, sweet-fleshed fruits that are consumed locally by man suggest primate dispersal.
    Habit
    Monoecious, monopodial treelet 0.8 – 3 (– 5) m tall
    Stem
    Stems brown with dense clusters of bright powdery-white, raised longitudinally elliptic or circular lenticels 0.5 – 1.5 mm long; second internode below apical inflorescence (3 –) 4 – 6 (– 8) mm diam., 1.5 – 2 cm long, glabrous
    Leaves
    Leaves alternate, 25 – 63 cm long, paripinnate, petiole (8 –) 9– 16.5 (– 19) cm long, terete, pulvinate at base, glabrous; rhachis (2 –) 3 – 4 (– 5)-jugate, (5.1 –) 9 – 24 cm long, the upper surface between at least the most distal three pairs of leaflets flattened, appressed, shortly brown hairy, with an acute central ridge and two lateral wings
    Leaflets
    Leaflets glabrous, opposite or subopposite, glossy pale green above and below, oblong-elliptic, (12 –) 15 – 24 × (3 –) 5.5 – 9 (– 10.2) cm, apex acute with an acumen (0.5 –) 1 – 2.5 (– 3) cm long, base acute to obtuse, lateral nerves and midrib yellow, raised on upper surface, (7 –) 9 – 14 (– 17) pairs, brochidodromous, the loops coming to within 1.5 – 2 mm of the margin, tertiary and quaternary nerves conspicuous on lower surface, reticulate; petiolules 1 – 5 (– 7) mm long, pulvinate
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence a c. 150-flowered, more or less conical, terminal panicle, c. 8.4 – 20 × 5.3 – 20 cm; auxiliary inflorescences in the axils of the distal 1 or 2 leaves, usually unbranched, up to 30 cm long; peduncle of terminal inflorescences 0.5 – 2 cm long; first order bracts linear, curved, patent, c. 3 × 0.5 mm; indumentum sparsely red brown appressed, simple-hairy, hairs c. 0.1 mm long; primary branches 10 – 15, the proximal 3 – 6 branches each 4 – 7 cm long, far longer than the 0.5 – 1.5 cm long distal branches; secondary branches numerous, 1 – 2 per cm length of each primary branch, each 3 – 10 mm long, (1 –) 3 – 4 (– 7)-flowered, second order bracts 1 – 2 mm long, patent
    Pedicel
    Pedicels 2 – 3 mm long, articulated halfway along their length, the proximal portion bearing two spirally inserted bracteoles. Bracteoles orbicular, appressed, c. 0.25 mm diam. Flowers white, or very pale yellow-white, smelling of Hyacinthus at noon, (2.5 –) 3 (– 4) × 2 – 5 mm (in live or hydrated material to 6 × 6 mm, remaining floral measurements from hydrated and live material, multiply by 0.5 for equivalent measurement in dried material)
    Calyx
    Calyx globose, green, sepals hemicircular to circular, concave, green, 3.5 – 4.2 × 3.2 – 4 mm, outer sepals at larger end of range, apex rounded
    Corolla
    Corolla apex exserted slightly from calyx, petals oblong or obovate, 3.75 – 4 × 2 – 2.6 mm, apex rounded or truncate, base cuneate, margins of distal half, rarely of the whole petal, densely white fimbriate-laciniate, fimbriae 0.2 mm long, inner and outer surface glabrous, adaxial surface with an appendage; appendage flap-like, semi-circular-secant, 0.5 – 1 mm long, apex rounded or bifid, or divided centrally into two equal appendages, margin fimbriate-laciniate, as the petal apex, base extending the full width of the petal, inserted two-thirds to three-quarters the length from the petal base to its apex; junction of the appendage with the petal extending in a straight line across the width of the petal sometimes with an extension towards the base of the petal along the midline
    Type
    Cameroon, South West Province, BakossiMts, c. 3 km W of Kodmin on path to Loh Mt, 4°59'N 9°41'E, 1450 m alt., fl. 12 Nov. 1998, Cheek 9580 (holotypus K; isotypi P, WAG, YA).
    Stamens
    Stamens 12 –15, exserted for 1 mm at anthesis, 3 – 4.7 mm long, lower, glabrous part of filament 1.25 – 2.5 mm long, upper part densely white puberulent, 1.15 – 1.5 mm long; anthers 0.6 – 0.7 mm long
    Flowers
    Female flowers with disk inconspicuous; stamens c. 2.5 mm long, arching upwards around the ovary, otherwise as in male flowers; ovary globose in outline, c. 1.5 × 2 mm, strongly 3-lobed, very sparsely hairy; style c. 3 mm long, 0.5 mm wide, gradually dilating to 0.7 mm at the middle, apical 0.5 mm recurved, surface papillate, stigma capitate Male flowers
    Infructescences
    Infructescences with overall dimensions as the inflorescences, 1 – 20-fruited
    Fruits
    Fruit usually with only a single carpel reaching maturity (rarely 2 or 3), yellow-orange, fleshy, indehiscent, glabrous, drying rugose, obliquely obovoid to globose, 2 – 3 × (1.7 –) 2 – 3 cm, 1-seeded, usually with 1 or 2 vestigial basal carpels, each 2 × 2 mm
    Seeds
    Seed green, the cotyledons fleshy
    Distribution
    Cameroon and Nigeria.
    Ecology
    Understorey of submontane evergreen forest; (880 −) 1000 − 2050 m.
    Conservation
    The fact that 49 specimens are cited here is an indication that in some parts of its range Deinbolliaoreophila is not a rare species. However, the species is not evenly distributed over its range. Most of the specimens cited (30) are from Mt Kupe and the BakossiMts, which are probably its stronghold and where it appears to be one of the most frequent understorey shrubs. Despite recent concerns regarding logging, it looks likely that at least part of this area is en route to becoming a protected area (Cheek et al. 2004). The fact that only two specimens are known from Mt Cameroon despite recent botanical inventory as intense as that of the former area suggests that there it is comparatively rare. Forest at Mt Cameroon, e.g. at Bambuko, is under extreme pressure from clearance for market gardening. Although only three specimens are known from the Rumpi Hills, and one from Nta Ali, these areas are largely unexplored botanically apart from the work of Thomas, and further observations might show D. oreophila to be as common there as in the adjoining Bakossi Mts. The same applies to the Ebo Forest where, so far only a single specimen has been collected. Here commercial logging is a threat (Fenton pers. comm. 2008). The Obudu Plateau in Nigeria is an underexplored extension of the Cameroon Highlands. Two specimens dating from the 1970’s suggest that Deinbolliaoreophila has a firm foothold there, although it may be threatened by extensive development recently (T. Morakinyo pers. comm.). In North West Province Cameroon, the forests of which probably once hosted the main population of this species, most of the submontane and montane forest has long been extirpated, and that little which survives is steadily being lost. In the Kilum-Ijim area, forest loss of 25% over 8 years in the 1980s has been recorded (Moat in Cheek et al. 2000). The 9 – 10 km² enclave of forest that survives at the Bali Ngemba Forest Reserve still holds a healthy population (10 specimens are known) discovered during a survey in 2000 (Harvey et al. 2004). However, this is probably its last refuge in North West Province: surveys in other forest fragments in the Province have not revealed it (pers. obs. MC). Even at Bali Ngemba, the forest is still being reduced in quality and extent year after year. In conclusion, Deinbolliaoreophila is here rated as VU A2c, i.e.vulnerable (IUCN 2001) given the continued loss of its submontane forest habitat, which we rate at 30% over its whole range over the last 100 years.
    Vernacular
    Local Name & Use. NTAMTEHKOB (Bali language), fruits eaten, tasting sweet fide Peter Nkankano of Mantum, cited in Pollard 413; MBONGMBONGKOB (Bali), Peter Nkankano, cited in Pollard 923.
    Disc
    Extra-staminal disc torus-like, glabrous, 1.4 – 3 mm wide, 0.3 – 0.7 mm high, outer wall concave, with an equatorial constriction, apex with c. 12, erect teeth, c. 0.4 mm high, apices rounded, alternating with the staminal filaments

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Cameroon, Nigeria

    Deinbollia oreophila Cheek appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Jan 1, 2010 Ghogue, J.-P. [1054], Cameroon K000746441
    Nov 1, 2008 Groves, M. [90], Cameroon K000197875
    Sep 1, 2008 Tchiengue, B. [2640], Cameroon K000008190
    Jan 1, 2008 Keay, R.W.J. [37489], Cameroon K000093233
    Jan 1, 2008 Thomas, D.W. [4484], Cameroon K000093232
    Jan 1, 2008 Thomas, D.W. [5286], Cameroon K000197891
    Jan 1, 2008 Thomas, D.W. [10322], Cameroon K000510709
    Jan 1, 2008 Thomas, D.W. [10486], Cameroon K000510710
    Jan 1, 2008 Thomas, D.W. [10525], Cameroon K000510712
    Jan 1, 2008 Thomas, D.W. [10486], Cameroon K000510718
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M. [7602], Cameroon K000197870
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M. [8993], Cameroon K000197871
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M. [7887], Cameroon K000197872
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M. [9001], Cameroon K000197873
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M. [7189], Cameroon K000197887
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M. [12961], Cameroon K000510837
    Jan 1, 2008 Cable, S. [855], Cameroon K000197880
    Jan 1, 2008 Cable, S. [48], Cameroon K000197890
    Jan 1, 2008 Cable, S. [1181], Cameroon K000197892
    Jan 1, 2008 Etuge, M. [4004], Cameroon K000197874
    Jan 1, 2008 Etuge, M. [2186], Cameroon K000197882
    Jan 1, 2008 Etuge, M. [1589], Cameroon K000197884
    Jan 1, 2008 Etuge, M. [2478], Cameroon K000197889
    Jan 1, 2008 Etuge, M. [1658], Cameroon K000197894
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M.R. [9580], Cameroon K000510717
    Jan 1, 2008 Cheek, M.R. [9580], Cameroon K000197888 holotype
    Jan 1, 2005 Lane, P. [222], Cameroon K000197941
    Jan 1, 2005 Etuge, M. [4482], Cameroon K000197881
    Jan 1, 2005 Etuge, M. [4717], Cameroon K000746437
    Jan 1, 2005 Pollard, B.J. [413], Cameroon K000746443
    Jan 1, 2005 Pollard, B.J. [413], Cameroon K000746444
    Jan 1, 2005 Pollard, B.J. [413], Cameroon K000746445
    Jan 1, 2005 Zapfack, L. [2047], Cameroon K000746439
    Jan 1, 2005 Onana, J.-M. [1804], Cameroon K000746440
    Jan 1, 2005 Ujor, E.U. [FHI 30355], Cameroon K000093231
    Jan 1, 2005 Ghogue, J.-P. [1040], Cameroon K000746438
    Jan 1, 2005 Tadjouteu, F. [398], Cameroon K000746442
    Nov 1, 2003 Cheek, M. [10263], Cameroon K000197868
    Nov 1, 2003 Cheek, M. [7091], Cameroon K000197893
    Nov 1, 2003 Cable, S. [3786], Cameroon K000197867
    Cheek, M. [8227], Cameroon K000510711
    Tadjouteu, F. [485], Cameroon K000510706

    First published in Kew Bull. 64: 504 (2009)

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin
    • Cheek, M., Pollard, B. J., Darbyshire, I., Onana, J.-M. & Wild, C. (2004). The Plants of Kupe, Mwangenguba and the BakossiMts, Cameroon. A Conservation Checklist. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • Harvey, Y., Pollard, B. J., Darbyshire, I., Onana, J.-M. & Cheek, M. (2004). The Plants of Bali Ngemba Forest Reserve, Cameroon. A Conservation Checklist. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • IUCN (2001). IUCN Red List Categories: Version 3.1. Prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.Google Scholar
    • Moat, J. (2000). Maps on backcover of: M. Cheek, J.-M. Onana & B. J. Pollard, The Plants of Mount Oku and the Ijim Ridge, Cameroon. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
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    • Cable, S. (1998). Sapindaceae, pp. 125 – 128. In: S. Cable & M. Cheek (eds.), The Plants of Mt Cameroon. A Conservation Checklist. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
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    • Thomas, D. W. (1986). Notes on Deinbollia species from Cameroon. Ann. Missouri Bot. Gard. 73 (1): 219 – 221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Fouilloy, R. & Hallé, N. (1973). Sapindacées, Flore du Cameroun 16. Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, Paris.Google Scholar
    • Keay, R. W. J. (1958). Sapindaceae, pp. 709 – 725. In : R. W. J. Keay (ed.), Flora of West Tropical Africa 1 (2). Crown Agents, London.Google Scholar
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    Sources

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
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    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
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    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0