1. Family: Araceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Anthurium Schott
      1. Anthurium morii Mayo & Haigh

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Brazil (C. Bahia).

    [KBu]

    Haigh, A., Mayo, S.J. & Coelho, M.A.N. Kew Bull (2011) 66: 123. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-011-9269-9

    Type
    Typus: Brazil, Bahia, Município de Mucugê, 27 July 1979, S. A. Mori, R. M. King, T. S. dos Santos & J. L. Hage 12680 (holotypus CEPEC; isotypi K, US).
    General
    Description based on dried material only
    Habit
    Terrestrial, stem unknown
    Leaves
    Leaves drying brown Leaf blade 22 – 27.5 × 11.8 – 15 cm, 1.8 × longer than broad, stiffly coriaceous, cordate, broadest at or above middle, apex broadly and somewhat deeply emarginate, mucronate, posterior lobes 6.9 – 8.3 cm long with rounded tips, retrorse; sinus narrowly spathulate, 5.9 – 6.8 cm deep; basal veins 4 on each side, of which one is free from the basal costa; major veins ± flat adaxially, prominent abaxially: primary lateral veins 9 – 10 per side, departing midrib at (48.6° –) 49° – 52.3°, hardly distinct from interprimaries, upper basal vein forming inner collective vein, running at 1.5 – 2.5 cm from margin, second basal vein forming submarginal vein running at 0.1– 0.5 cm from margin
    Petiole
    Petiole (69.8 –) 71.2 − 104.7 (– 105.9) × 0.3 – 0.5 cm, 3.2 – 4 × longer than leaf blade, terete to sulcate adaxially, minutely and densely scabrous-verrucose
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence: Peduncle (41.3 –) 44.2 – 78.6 (– 79.6) × 0.3 – 1.1 cm, 0.6 – 0.8 × longer than the petiole
    Spathe
    Spathe 4.1 – 4.8 × 0.4 – 0.5 cm, 3± spreading, linear-lanceolate
    Spadix
    Spadix (3.2 –) 3.6 – 7.3 × 0.3 – 0.6 cm, subcylindric, slightly tapering apically; flowers 0.2 – 0.23 cm wide, 0.32 – 0.38 times as wide as spadix, style not prominent
    Fruits
    Berries and seeds unknown.
    Distribution
    Endemic to the municipality of Mucugê, uplands of the Chapada Diamantina, interior of Bahia state, Brazil
    Ecology
    Terrestrial in ‘campo rupestre’; 1,000 m.
    Conservation
    Anthurium morii is a rare species, having been found only once. The preliminary IUCN conservation rating is Data Deficient [DD].
    Note
    Named for Scott A. Mori, the collector of the only known specimen, in recognition of his work on the Bahian flora. Anthurium morii is known from a single collection made near the small town of Mucugê, on the eastern side of the Chapada Diamantina. This locality is almost central within the known range of A. zappiae Haigh, Nadruz & Mayo (see below) and A. morii is very similar to this species in characters unusual in section Urospadix, i.e. the basally lobed leaves and minutely scabrid-verrucose petioles and peduncles. We nevertheless propose it as a separate species because of the following combination of vegetative characters, which separate the two species on the available material; this character combination needs to be tested by new field studies. In A. morii, the petiole is usually longer (median length 93 cm), the leaf blade is broadest above the petiolar plexus and cordate rather than sagittate or hastate, the posterior lobes are retrorse with four basal veins, the anterior lobe has nine to ten primary lateral veins, the leaf apex is deeply emarginate and there are two distinct inframarginal collective veins rather than one. A. zappiae has a shorter petiole (median length 34 cm), the leaf blade is broadest below the petiolar plexus across the sagittate to strongly hastate posterior lobes, there are usually three basal veins, the anterior lobe has ten to 14 primary lateral veins, the leaf apex is acute to rounded and there is only one distinct inframarginal collective vein.
    [CATE]

    CATE Araceae, 17 Dec 2011. araceae.e-monocot.org

    Conservation

    Anthurium morii is a rare species, having been found only once. The preliminary IUCN conservation rating is Data Deficient [DD].

    Distribution

    Endemic to the municipality of Mucugê, uplands of the Chapada Diamantina, interior of Bahia state, Brazil.

    General Description

    Description based on dried material only. Terrestrial, stem unknown. Leaves drying brown. Petiole (69.8 –) 71.2 − 104.7 (– 105.9) × 0.3 – 0.5 cm, 3.2 – 4 × longer than leaf blade, terete to sulcate adaxially, minutely and densely scabrous-verrucose. Leaf blade 22 – 27.5 × 11.8 – 15 cm, 1.8 × longer than broad, stiffly coriaceous, cordate, broadest at or above middle, apex broadly and somewhat deeply emarginate, mucronate, posterior lobes 6.9 – 8.3 cm long with rounded tips, retrorse; sinus narrowly spathulate, 5.9 – 6.8 cm deep; basal veins 4 on each side, of which one is free from the basal costa; major veins ± flat adaxially, prominent abaxially: primary lateral veins 9 – 10 per side, departing midrib at (48.6° –) 49° – 52.3°, hardly distinct from interprimaries, upper basal vein forming inner collective vein, running at 1.5 – 2.5 cm from margin, second basal vein forming submarginal vein running at 0.1– 0.5 cm from margin. Inflorescence: Peduncle (41.3 –) 44.2 – 78.6 (– 79.6) × 0.3 – 1.1 cm, 0.6 – 0.8 × longer than the petiole. Spathe 4.1 – 4.8 × 0.4 – 0.5 cm, 3 ± spreading, linear-lanceolate. Spadix (3.2 –) 3.6 – 7.3 × 0.3 – 0.6 cm, subcylindric, slightly tapering apically; flowers 0.2 – 0.23 cm wide, 0.32 – 0.38 times as wide as spadix, style not prominent. Berries and seeds unknown.

    Habitat

    Terrestrial in ‘campo rupestre’

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Brazil Northeast

    Anthurium morii Mayo & Haigh appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Nov 1, 1981 Mori, S.A. [12680], Bahia K000302696 Unknown type material
    Mori, S.A. [s.n.], Brazil K000501803 isotype

    First published in Kew Bull. 66: 123 (2011)

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin
    • Andrade, I. M., Mayo, S. J. & França, F. (2006). Araceae. In: A. M. Giulietti, A. Conceição & L. P. Queiroz (eds), Diversidade e Caracterização das Fanerógamas do Semi-ÁridoBrasileiro 1: 52 – 55, AssociaçãoPlantas do Nordeste, Recife, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Temponi, L. G. (2006). Sistemática de Anthurium sect. Urospadix (Araceae). Ph.D. thesis, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Harley, R. M. & Giulietti, A. M. (2004). Wild Flowers of the Chapada Diamantina. São Carlos, Rima, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Nadruz Coelho, M. A. (2004). Taxonomia e biogeografia das espécies do gênero Anthurium (Araceae) SeçãoUrospadixSubseçãoFlavescentiviridia. Ph.D. Thesis, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Bogner, J. & Gonçalves, E. G. (2002). Two new aroids from South America. Willdenowia 32: 323 – 329.Google Scholar
    • Hammer, Ø., Harper, D. A. T. & Ryan, P. D. (2001). PAST: Palaeontological Statistics software package for education and data analysis. PalaeontologiaElectonica 4: 9 pp. http://folk.uio.no/ohammer/past.
    • Sakuragui, C. M. & Mayo, S. J. (1999). A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from south-eastern Brazil. FeddesRepert. 110: 535 – 539.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1995). Araceae. In: B. L. Stannard, Flora of the Pico das Almas, pp. 648 – 649. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1990). Problems of speciation, biogeography and systematics in some Araceae of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. In: S. Watanabe, Anais do II Simpósio de Ecossistemas da Costa Sul e SudesteBrasileira, São Paulo, Brazil 1: 235 – 258. Academia de Ciências do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1986). Araceae. In: R. M. Harley & N. A.Simmons, Florula of Mucugê, Chapada Diamantina – Bahia, Brazil, pp. 21 – 23. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1984). Aspectos da Fitogeografia das AráceasBahianas. Anais do XXXIV Congresso Nacional de Botanica, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil 2: 215 – 227.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1983). Araceae. In: S. A. Mori, B. M. Boom, A. M. de Carvalho & T. S. dos Santos, Southern Bahian Moist Forests. Bot. Rev. 49: 209 – 210.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J. (1978a). Aroid-hunting in Bahia. Aroideana 1: 4 – 10.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1978b). A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Bahia, Brazil. Bradea 2: 281 – 286.Google Scholar

    Sources

    CATE Araceae
    Haigh, A., Clark, B., Reynolds, L., Mayo, S.J., Croat, T.B., Lay, L., Boyce, P.C., Mora, M., Bogner, J., Sellaro, M., Wong, S.Y., Kostelac, C., Grayum, M.H., Keating, R.C., Ruckert, G., Naylor, M.F. and Hay, A., CATE Araceae, 17 Dec 2011.
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.
    Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0