1. Family: Araceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Anthurium Schott
      1. Anthurium zappiae Haigh, Nadruz & Mayo

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Brazil (C. Bahia).

    [KBu]

    Haigh, A., Mayo, S.J. & Coelho, M.A.N. Kew Bull (2011) 66: 123. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-011-9269-9

    Type
    Typus: Brazil, Bahia, Município de Barra da Estiva, 23 May 1991, S. J. Mayo, E. B. Santos, A. K. Mayo & J. Bispo dos Santos 855 (holotypus CEPEC; isotypi K, MO, RB).
    Habit
    Terrestrial, creeping, rhizomatous herb
    Roots
    Roots to 20 cm long, 0.2 – 0.5 cm diam., thick and fleshy
    Stem
    Internodes short to 4.5 × 0.3 – 1.1 cm, longer than broad to as long as broad
    Cataphylls
    Cataphylls 1.5 – 6 cm long, dull brown and membranaceous, persisting ± intact along the rhizomatous stem
    Leaves
    Leaves: Petiole (12 –) 15.8 – 82.3 (– 83.3) × 0.2 – 0.3 (– 0.4) cm, (0.7 –) 0.8 – 3.1 (– 3.3) × longer than leaf blade, green, either terete or adaxially gently sulcate with obtuse margins and abaxially rounded, minutely and densely scabrous-verrucose, geniculum 0.9 – 1.0 cm long, swollen, paler and thicker than petiole Leaf blade suberect, (12 –) 14.3 – 29.3 (– 30.1) × (7.5 –) 10.1 – 18.7 (– 20) cm, widest at or below the petiolar plexus, 1.2 – 2.4 × longer than broad, adaxially dark ± glossy green, abaxially much paler with darker primary lateral and collective veins, stiffly coriaceous to subcoriaceous, sagittate to hastate, apex acute, obtuse to rounded, mucronate, posterior lobes (3.5 –) 5.1 – 10 (– 10.6) cm long with rounded tips, (0.25 –) 0.27 – 0.41 × as long as entire blade, subextrorse to extrorse; sinus arcuate, arcuate with blade decurrent on petiole, broadly hippocrepiform, parabolic or spathulate, (0.3 –) 0.4 – 7.5 (– 9.1) cm deep; basal veins (2 –) 3 – 4 , usually 1 free to base; midrib adaxially shallowly rounded but impressed between the somewhat conduplicate halves of blade, abaxially strongly prominent, rounded and asperate, primary lateral veins 10 – 13 (– 15) on each side, hardly distinct from interprimaries, arising from the midrib at an angle of (31.5 –) 33.6 – 48.2 (– 50.3) degrees, when dry adaxially ± flat and abaxially prominent, in life adaxially etched and impressed and abaxially prominent, submarginal collective vein running at (0.4 –) 0.5 – 0.8 (– 1) cm from margin on each side, formed from the uppermost basal vein, blade margin revolute
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence: Peduncle (20 –) 22.9 – 43.9 (– 46.5) × c. 0.2 cm, 0.8 – 1.7 (– 2) × longer than the petiole, 9.5 × longer than spadix, green, slightly angled in cross-section, asperate
    Spathe
    Spathe 1.7 – 4.1 (– 5.1) × 0.4 – 0.8 (– 1.4) cm, linear-lanceolate, livid-purplish to brownish-green, reflexed or spreading, apex cuspidate, margins revolute
    Spadix
    Spadix 2.2 – 5.1 (– 6.5) × 0.4 – 0.5 (– 0.6) cm, subcylindric and tapering apically or cylindric, vinaceous; stipe short, 0.2 cm long; flowers 0.15 – 0.17 cm wide, 0.36 – 0.41 times as wide as spadix, tepals dull purplish, style slightly prominent
    Fruits
    Berries and seeds unknown.
    Distribution
    Brazil, Bahia
    Ecology
    Occurs in uplands and mountainous landscapes as a shade-loving plant of small woodlands (and carrascos) in stream valleys; 750 – 1,250 m. The rhizome lies hidden in the humus layer.
    Conservation
    The preliminary IUCN conservation rating is Vulnerable [VU].
    Note
    Named for Daniela C. Zappi, who first collected this species in 1991. Anthurium zappiae is closely related to to A. morii, as discussed under the latter. It is also similar to A. acutum N. E. Br., a species which occurs in the southern Atlantic Forest in the states of São Paulo, Paraná and Santa Catarina (Temponi2006). We compared the new species with material at K of A. acutum, including the type (W. Bull Sept. 10 1886, holotype, K; Cult. Kew 1964, Seidal 671 – 62, K; Hatschbach 24390, K). Both species have sagittate to hastate leaves but A. zappiae differs in its scabrid-verrucose petiole, acute to obtuse leaf apex, shorter basal lobes, fewer basal veins, more numerous primary lateral veins in the anterior lobe which arise from the midrib at a smaller angle and a smaller spathe and spadix (see Table 1 for further details).

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Brazil Northeast

    Anthurium zappiae Haigh, Nadruz & Mayo appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Kew Bull. 66: 131 (2011)

    Literature

    Kew Bulletin
    • Andrade, I. M., Mayo, S. J. & França, F. (2006). Araceae. In: A. M. Giulietti, A. Conceição & L. P. Queiroz (eds), Diversidade e Caracterização das Fanerógamas do Semi-ÁridoBrasileiro 1: 52 – 55, AssociaçãoPlantas do Nordeste, Recife, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Temponi, L. G. (2006). Sistemática de Anthurium sect. Urospadix (Araceae). Ph.D. thesis, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Harley, R. M. & Giulietti, A. M. (2004). Wild Flowers of the Chapada Diamantina. São Carlos, Rima, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Nadruz Coelho, M. A. (2004). Taxonomia e biogeografia das espécies do gênero Anthurium (Araceae) SeçãoUrospadixSubseçãoFlavescentiviridia. Ph.D. Thesis, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil.Google Scholar
    • Bogner, J. & Gonçalves, E. G. (2002). Two new aroids from South America. Willdenowia 32: 323 – 329.Google Scholar
    • Hammer, Ø., Harper, D. A. T. & Ryan, P. D. (2001). PAST: Palaeontological Statistics software package for education and data analysis. PalaeontologiaElectonica 4: 9 pp. http://folk.uio.no/ohammer/past.
    • Sakuragui, C. M. & Mayo, S. J. (1999). A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from south-eastern Brazil. FeddesRepert. 110: 535 – 539.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1995). Araceae. In: B. L. Stannard, Flora of the Pico das Almas, pp. 648 – 649. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1990). Problems of speciation, biogeography and systematics in some Araceae of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. In: S. Watanabe, Anais do II Simpósio de Ecossistemas da Costa Sul e SudesteBrasileira, São Paulo, Brazil 1: 235 – 258. Academia de Ciências do Estado de São Paulo, São Paulo.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1986). Araceae. In: R. M. Harley & N. A.Simmons, Florula of Mucugê, Chapada Diamantina – Bahia, Brazil, pp. 21 – 23. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1984). Aspectos da Fitogeografia das AráceasBahianas. Anais do XXXIV Congresso Nacional de Botanica, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil 2: 215 – 227.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1983). Araceae. In: S. A. Mori, B. M. Boom, A. M. de Carvalho & T. S. dos Santos, Southern Bahian Moist Forests. Bot. Rev. 49: 209 – 210.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J. (1978a). Aroid-hunting in Bahia. Aroideana 1: 4 – 10.Google Scholar
    • Mayo, S. J.  (1978b). A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Bahia, Brazil. Bradea 2: 281 – 286.Google Scholar

    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0