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  1. Family: Myricaceae Rich. ex Kunth
    1. Genus: Myrica L.
      1. Myrica chimanimaniana (Verdc. & Polhill) Christenh. & Byng

        This species is accepted, and its native range is S. Tropical Africa (Chimanimani Mountains).

    [FZ]

    Flora Zambesiaca. Vol. 9, Part 3. Polygonaceae-Myriaceae. Pope GV, Polhill RM, Martins ES. 2006.

    Type
    Type:Zimbabwe, Chimanimani Mts., Wild 4587 (K, holotype; SRGH).
    Inflorescences
    Female and bisexual catkins elongating as the fruits develop, becoming lax, ultimately exceeding the leaves and up to 5 cm long or sometimes apparently remaining short; axis hairy; bracts 1.5–2 mm long, ovate-triangular to broadly ovate, ciliolate, sometimes with a few glands dorsally; bracteoles 4, 0.8–1 mm long, ovate, concave, ciliolate; style arms 1.5 mm long, linear-caudate Male catkins fairly dense, 6–8(12) mm long; bracts 1.5–1.8 mm long, broadly ovate-triangular, becoming more broadly deltate in the upper part and contracted to a narrow base, ciliolate; stamens 3–4 Male catkins fairly dense, 6–8(12) mm long; bracts 1.5–1.8 mm long, broadly ovate-triangular, becoming more broadly deltate in the upper part and contracted to a narrow base, ciliolate; stamens 3–4. Female and bisexual catkins elongating as the fruits develop, becoming lax, ultimately exceeding the leaves and up to 5 cm long or sometimes apparently remaining short; axis hairy; bracts 1.5–2 mm long, ovate-triangular to broadly ovate, ciliolate, sometimes with a few glands dorsally; bracteoles 4, 0.8–1 mm long, ovate, concave, ciliolate; style arms 1.5 mm long, linear-caudate.
    Ecology
    Montane grassland, sometimes in rocky places, extending to upper fringe of Brachystegia, Erica (Philippia) woodland; 1500–2150 m.
    Note
    Morella chimanimaniana has been associated with Morella brevifolia, a South African species restricted to the hills and mountains of KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape. M. brevifolia is also a dwarf species with an underground rootstock, but the leaves are very different, elliptic or obovate and rounded or cuneate at the base, see photograph on p. 525 of Pooley, Wild Flowers KwaZulu-Natal (1998). M. chimanimaniana is probably more closely related to M. humilis (Cham. & Schltdl.) Killick, a shrubby species, which in a strict sense occurs only along the coast of South Africa between the districts of Bredasdorp and Albany. That species is much more variable than M. chimanimaniana, but leaf forms can be matched fairly closely, even if not so obviously oblong-elliptic and serrate, but, apart from the habit M. chimanimaniana has a very characteristic indumentum on the branchlets with a distinct understorey of short weak spreading hairs among which there are long wispy spreading hairs. In M. humilis the understorey is little developed. The female inflorescences in M. chimanimaniana can elongate well beyond the leaves as in M. humilis, but apparently not in M. brevifolia. The bisexual catkins of Wild 3601 (cited above), however, are short up to the fruiting stage, as are the apparently female catkins of Bamps, Symoens & Vanden Berghen 836 (BR; K), so this may well not be a very reliable character.
    Distribution
    Mozambique Known only from the Chimanimani Mts. ZIM E Zimbabwe
    Habit
    Suffrutex up to 30–45 cm tall, with several stems from a narrow rhizomatous rootstock, only sparingly branched above in the sterile state but short branches proliferating with the development of catkins, dioecious or monoecious with a few male flowers at the base of the otherwise female catkins or male catkins developed after female catkins on the same branchlet. Suffrutex up to 30–45 cm tall, with several stems from a narrow rhizomatous rootstock, only sparingly branched above in the sterile state but short branches proliferating with the development of catkins, dioecious or monoecious with a few male flowers at the base of the otherwise female catkins or male catkins developed after female catkins on the same branchlet
    Branches
    Branchlets covered with wispy spreading hairs and an understorey of short hairs and glands; youngest internodes slightly angular. Branchlets covered with wispy spreading hairs and an understorey of short hairs and glands; youngest internodes slightly angular
    Leaves
    Leaves subsessile; petiole comprised of a basal pulvinus 1–2 mm long; blades 2–4.5 × 0.8–1.8 cm, 2–2.5 times as long as broad, oblong-elliptic, acute to obtuse at apex, cordate at the base (the petiole included within the sinus), markedly serrate for most of its length, glabrous or with wispy hairs along the midvein towards the base above and along the veins beneath, with the glands sparse to fairly numerous and conspicuous; lateral nerves 10–12 on either side, fine, spreading nearly at right angles. Leaves subsessile; petiole comprised of a basal pulvinus 1–2 mm long; blades 2–4.5 × 0.8–1.8 cm, 2–2.5 times as long as broad, oblong-elliptic, acute to obtuse at apex, cordate at the base (the petiole included within the sinus), markedly serrate for most of its length, glabrous or with wispy hairs along the midvein towards the base above and along the veins beneath, with the glands sparse to fairly numerous and conspicuous; lateral nerves 10–12 on either side, fine, spreading nearly at right angles
    Male
    Male catkins fairly dense, 6–8(12) mm long; bracts 1.5–1.8 mm long, broadly ovate-triangular, becoming more broadly deltate in the upper part and contracted to a narrow base, ciliolate; stamens 3–4.
    Female and Hermaphrodite
    Female and bisexual catkins elongating as the fruits develop, becoming lax, ultimately exceeding the leaves and up to 5 cm long or sometimes apparently remaining short; axis hairy; bracts 1.5–2 mm long, ovate-triangular to broadly ovate, ciliolate, sometimes with a few glands dorsally; bracteoles 4, 0.8–1 mm long, ovate, concave, ciliolate; style arms 1.5 mm long, linear-caudate.
    Fruits
    Fruits 4 mm across, ovoid. Fruits 4 mm across, ovoid.

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Mozambique, Zimbabwe

    Synonyms

    Other Data

    Myrica chimanimaniana (Verdc. & Polhill) Christenh. & Byng appears in other Kew resources:

    Bibliography

    First published in Global Fl. 4: 127 (2018)

    Literature

    Kew Backbone Distributions

    • Pope, G.V., Polhill, R.M. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2006). Flora Zambesiaca 9(3): 1-277. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0