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  1. Family: Apiaceae Lindl.
    1. Genus: Heracleum L.
      1. Heracleum abyssinicum (Boiss.) C.Norman

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Eritrea to N. Malawi.

    [FZ]

    Umbelliferae, J. F. M. Cannon. Flora Zambesiaca 4. 1978

    Habit
    Perennial or biennial herbs with fleshy to woody taproots, up to c. 1 m. tall.
    Stem
    Stem terete, solid, rather coarsely striate with clearly marked ridges, often purplish especially near the base, covered with numerous short, erect bristly hairs some of which are glandular; the base covered with fibrous remains of old leaf bases.
    Leaves
    Leaves up to 30 × 7 cm., simply pinnate, mostly basal, with 3–7 pairs of ovate-deltate leaflets and 1 terminal one. Leaves sheathing at the base; petiole approximately 1/3 the total length of the leaf.
    Leaflets
    Leaflets jaggedly cut and toothed, sometimes nearly reaching the midrib; teeth ending in a short hyaline mucro.
    Indumentum
    Petiole and rhachis with hairs similar to those on the stem; superior surface of the leaflets with scattered, short, fine appressed hairs; inferior surface nearly glabrous with a few hairs on the veins only; margin with a fringe of short spreading hairs.
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescence of terminal and lateral compound umbels. Rays 7–14, subequal; bracts 0-several, small, linear and inconspicuous. Partial umbels with 10–20 flowers, mostly hermaphrodite but sometimes with a small group of male flowers at the centre; bracteoles 0-few, similar to the bracts; pedicels relatively robust.
    Corolla
    Petals white, the outer ones more or less radiate.
    Fruits
    Fruit c. 9 × 5 mm., obovate, strongly dorsally compressed; calyx teeth obsolete; stylopodium conical with somewhat lobed base; styles 1·5 times as long as the stylopodium, tending to fall in fruit. Fruit wings well developed and forming a notch in which the stylopodium is situated at maturity. Dorsal ridges filiform.
    Vittae
    Vittae 1 in each interval and 2 in the commissural face.
    Carpophore
    Carpophore deeply 2-cleft.
    [FTEA]

    Umbelliferae, C.C. Townsend. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1989

    Habit
    Perennial, 0.2–1.8(–2.5 when growing in and supported by bushes) m., with fistular, sulcate-striate, densely pilose stems; stems 3–8 mm. wide below, simple or frequently with one or more long, ascending branches from the lower half upwards, branches with much-reduced leaves.
    Leaves
    Basal leaves several, ± narrowly oblong in outline, ± 8–23 × 2–8 cm., simply pinnate with 3–7 pairs of roundish to ovate or broadly deltoid, 1–4.5 × 0.8–5 cm. irregularly incised-dentate to subpinnatifid leaflets, teeth blunt to subacute, mucronate; indumentum ± generally distributed over both surfaces but densest on the veins and margins; sheaths striate, rather narrow, ± 1.5–3 × 0.8–1 cm.; petiole ± 4–11 cm.; median stem leaves shortly petiolate or sessile on the sheaths, leaflets similar or more sharply dentate and/or with narrower segments; sheaths not very broad and inflated, ± 1–2.5 × 0.8–1 cm.; uppermost leaves much reduced, often with a very small lamina; sheaths small, up to ± 2 × 0.8 cm.
    Inflorescences
    Umbels several, on sulcate peduncles 2.5–12 cm. long; rays (4–)6–18, sulcate, densely pilose, 1.5–6 cm.; involucre usually present but sometimes very small, of ± 3–6 narrowly linear or broader bracts mostly ± 3–10 mm. long; partial umbels ± 15–35-flowered, pedicels 3–10 mm., commonly furnished with dense and broad-based tuberculiform hairs and fewer, clearly marked off, longer glandular hairs, sometimes with short tuberculiform hairs only; involucels of 4–9 linear bracteoles 2–7 mm. in length, rarely exceeding the pedicels in young fruit.
    Calyx
    Calyx-teeth narrowly triangular to linear, sometimes persistent in fruit, ± 0.5 mm.
    Flowers
    Flowers white or creamy, the outermost petals of the outer partial umbels slightly radiate, cordate, 1.5–3 mm.; inner petals oblong-obovate with an incurved tip, ± 1.25 mm.
    Fruits
    Fruit obovate to oblong-obovate, 7–12 × 5–8 mm., thinly pilose throughout; stylopodia conical, not exceeding the apical notch of the fruit; styles arcuate-recurved, 1.5–2 mm.; vittae 4 dorsally, 2 on the commissure, all reaching to near the base or the commissural somewhat shorter.
    Habitat
    Most frequently in montane damp grassland, often at or near forest margins, also in long grass on cliffledges, in beds of dried-up stream in Erica-Protea community, among rocks in volcanic craters, also recorded from previously burned Erica-Hypericum-Protea bushland; 1900–3340 m.
    Distribution
    K1 K3 K4 K6 T2 T7 U1 U3

    Images

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Zaïre

    Synonyms

    Other Data

    Heracleum abyssinicum (Boiss.) C.Norman appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Sep 1, 2008 Luke, W.R.Q. [6941], Tanzania K000545246
    Jan 1, 1999 Stolz, A. [2391], Tanzania K000313557
    Jan 1, 1999 Stolz, A. [2391], Tanzania K000313556 isotype
    Jan 1, 1999 Schimper [204], Ethiopia K000313558 isotype
    Jan 1, 1999 Schimper [204], Ethiopia K000313560
    Jan 1, 1999 Schimper [204], Ethiopia K000313559 Unknown type material

    Bibliography

    First published in J. Bot. 74: 171 (1936)

    Accepted by

    • Van Wyk, B.-E., Tilney, P.M. & Magee, A.R. (2013). African Apiaceae: a synopsis of the Apiaceae/Umbelliferae of Sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar: 1- 317. Briza Academic Books, Pretoria.
    • Hedberg, I., Edwards, S. & Nemomissa, S. (eds.) (2003). Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea 4(1): 1-352. The National Herbarium, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia & The Department of Systematic Botany, Upps.
    • Townsend, C.C. (1989). Flora of Tropical East Africa, Umbelliferae: 1-127.
    • Launert, E. (ed.) (1978). Flora Zambesiaca 4: 1-658. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

    Literature

    Kew Backbone Distributions

    • Van Wyk, B.-E., Tilney, P.M. & Magee, A.R. (2013). African Apiaceae: a synopsis of the Apiaceae/Umbelliferae of Sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar: 1- 317. Briza Academic Books, Pretoria.
    • Hedberg, I., Edwards, S. & Nemomissa, S. (eds.) (2003). Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea 4(1): 1-352. The National Herbarium, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia & The Department of Systematic Botany, Upps.

    Flora of Tropical East Africa

    • Cannon in Flora Zambesiaca 4: 621 (1978).
    • A.D.Q. Agnew, Upland Kenya Wild Flowers p. 362 (1974).
    • Cufod., Enumeratio Plantarum Aethiopiae Spermatophyta (Supplement in Bull. Jard. Bot. Brux.) p. 650 (1959).
    • Norman in Journal of Botany 74: 171 (1936).

    Sources

    Flora Zambesiaca
    Flora Zambesiaca
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.
    Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2020. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0